Let be, what will be

/rēˈwīld/ 
restore (an area of land) to its natural uncultivated state

After a great spring debate, Brandon and I agreed to let our entire yard grow wild. The only exception to this rule – our comprise – was that we’d create a path that still would allow us to reach every area of the yard by foot, without disrupting the regrowth.

This, as we later found out, was a movement gaining momentum elsewhere too, all thanks to Plantlife’s No Mow May campaign. Whereby homeowners were encouraged to lock up their lawnmowers on May 1st and let the wildflowers bloom, providing a feast of nectar for our hungry pollinators.

By the time the winter breaks and the warm weather begins, honeybees will have usually made their way through all of their winter stores (the honey they eat through the winter that they collected in the spring), and are desperately longing for the dandelions to bloom.

Given that we ourselves had honeybees, this fuelled our efforts and gave them further purpose than just to restore our land, but now as well, to provide our bees with as much food as we can, as early as we can.

Next thing you knew it, we had hundreds of dandelions clouding our yard – turning what was bright spring green into a haze of yellow.

The honey bees were happy, and so were we. Who couldn’t smile at all those dandelions?

So, I’m curious to know – has anyone else let theirs grow? What have you seen since you’ve locked up the lawnmower?

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